give to the 50th anniversary

2016 celebrates the 50th anniversary of saving Glessner House as well as the beginning of the preservation movement in Chicago, efforts that have been and continue to be essential to the architectural legacy of this city.

Support Glessner House Museum with your tax-deductible gift to ensure our future for the next 50 years - and beyond! 


Removal of "For Sale" sign by Richard Wintergreen, December 1966. Photo by Richard Nickel.

Removal of "For Sale" sign by Richard Wintergreen, December 1966. Photo by Richard Nickel.

On April 16, 1966, a group of concerned citizens joined together to form the Chicago School of Architecture Foundation with an explicit purpose of saving H. H. Richardson's iconic Glessner House. The Foundation purchased the house for $35,000 and programming and restoration work soon followed. In 1976, the house was designated a National Historic Landmark, the highest recognition available to buildings nationwide.

The structure served as an inspiration to architects such as Louis Sullivan and Frank Lloyd Wright and helped redefine domestic architecture. Modernist architect Philip Johnson praised the building, stating that "it is the most important house in the country to me."

Tour group entering the house on Prairie Avenue, 1990s.

Tour group entering the house on Prairie Avenue, 1990s.

The house and its extensive collection of original furnishings offer relevant insights into the history of Chicago as an innovative center of architecture and design. As Glessner House Museum celebrates its first 50 years, it stands poised to attract an increasingly diverse audience, building on the concept of innovation that has defined it as an American architectural icon since 1887.

2016 celebrates the 50th anniversary of saving Glessner House as well as the beginning of the preservation movement in Chicago, efforts that have been and continue to be essential to the architectural legacy of this city.

Support Glessner House Museum with your tax-deductible gift to ensure our future for the next 50 years - and beyond!